All About the Jostaberry

This fruit bush of a deep black coloring has a wide range of uses.

The jostaberry grows heavy on its bush through the end of the summer, as long as the birds don’t get to it first! Birds love this tasty berry.

Fruit Description

The jostaberry is commonly eaten both cooked and raw. This fruit is too labor-intensive to harvest large amounts easily, even though its stems aren’t thorny, which keeps it out of large commercial stores around the world. However, it does freeze well, making it a good fresh food choice to have in situations that require food to last long-term. The bushes may reach as high as two meters.

How Does It Taste?

The taste of the jostaberry has been described as a cross between a blackcurrant and a gooseberry. When eaten raw and unripe, the flavor leans closer to the gooseberry side, but when fully ripened, the blackcurrant flavor is stronger.  It is a great choice for cordials, beverages, wines, jellies and jams, pies, and preserves. When the berries are allowed to fully ripen, they make for an incredible jam. But this fruit is not just limited to sweet dishes! It has a savory use and does very well in chicken dishes, salads, chutneys, or relishes. 

Just Desserts!

The best dessert to highlight the flavor of this fruit is a straightforward Jostaberry Jam. If you would like to try it in a drink form, follow this recipe for a sweet and strong Jostaberry Cordial. 

A Place in Pop Culture

The jostaberry is pronounced yust-a-berry and is popular across Europe for syrups and juices. The beauty of the jostaberry bush also gives it a high ornamental value and appreciation in landscaping.

Tasty Extras

There is some evidence to show that the high vitamin C quality found in the jostaberry can help prevent cardiovascular disease. Do you suffer from cold hands and feet? The jostaberry can help with that by improving your circulation.

All About the Japanese Plum

The Japanese plum is a broad name given to a host of different trees that bear edible fruit. 

Fruit Description

The Prunus mume is one of these types of trees, with relation to both the plum and the apricot tree. In common English, we call its fruit simply the plum, although it has more in common with the apricot. Because this tree with its beautiful white, red, and yellow blossoms blooms between the winter and spring seasons, it is appreciated as a seasonal symbol, the sign that the cold days of winter are over, and we’re headed into a warm spring.

How Does It Taste?

This fruit is widely used in juices and drinks because of its sweet flavoring. In Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, and Korean cuisine, it is a popular choice for sauces or pickling. It also is widely used in traditional medicine for its various health and wellness benefits. 

Just Desserts!

Follow this link to learn how to craft a Japanese Plum Cobbler that requires few ingredients and just a Pyrex dish in the way of cookware. For a fresh summer flavor, try this tasty option for Puff Pastry Plum Tarts, the perfect way to implement the sign of spring into a light and fresh dish. Another intriguing recipe is this one for Plum Sorbet. 

A Place in Pop Culture

The blossoms of this tree herald the spring, and so the visions of this tree are commonly used in movies, art, and photography to signify warmth, renewal, and the light of springtime. 

Tasty Extras

The extract of the plum is widely used in Asia as a hangover cure! The sour taste encourages the drinking of water and the makeup of the fruit helps your body replenish its sodium and potassium. In the 1800s, the acid of the plum was used to create an antidote for cholera. 

All About the Jambul

Long used medicinally, the jambul is a fruit not only delicious and nutritious, but also grows from a plant that boasts many uses.

Fruit Description

Grown from an evergreen tropical tree, this flowering plant stems from Pakistan, Indonesia, Bangladesh, and India. Today, it is also found in southern Asia and was introduced to the southern US in the early 1900s. This nutritious plant has many names and can be called the plum, jambul, jamun, black plum, faux pistachier, Indian blueberry, doowet, and jambolan, among other names. The plant itself reaches impressive heights, as it has been seen to grow up to 30 meters, but its life span is even more impressive, as plants have been noted to live for longer than 100 years. Not only prized for the fruit that it bears, this plant also offers ornamental benefits and is prized for the shade it offers as well as its strong wood and water-resistant texture.

How Does It Taste?

The jambul has a distinctly interesting taste. It has a flavor that has been described as a cross between an apple and green pepper. Not unique enough? That flavor also comes combined with a light rose taste and faint bitter aftertaste. With thin, waxy skin and a hollow core, this fruit boasts a high level of vitamin C and is often enjoyed raw or cooked into sauces, jellies, and jams.

Just Desserts!

What better way to celebrate the end of a hot summer than with a refreshing Jamun Ginger Lemonade? Follow this recipe to learn how to craft the perfect refreshing drink to get you through those hot August nights. If you are looking for a more versatile recipe, then try this one for a Jamun Jam that is sure to delight and impress.

Tasty Extras

The bark on the tree of this plant has been used for decades to create a rich brown dye and as the tanning for leather. The wood is incredibly durable in the face of water, making it an excellent choice for beams and rafters, oars, boats, and water troughs, among others.

All About the Jackfruit

Innocuously named, the jackfruit is a simple-seeming fruit with a big reputation.

Fruit Description

A species of the fig, mulberry, and breadfruit family, this tasty and distinctive fruit hails from the south of India and the rainforests of Borneo. The jack tree bears massive fruits, making the jackfruit the largest fruit of all trees. Jackfruit can weigh as much as 120 pounds and can reach 35 inches in length. With one tree able to produce up to 200 fruits in just a year, this fruit is a popular and delicious delicacy in the eastern world. To add to its uniqueness, the jackfruit is actually made up of hundreds of thousands of individual flowers, with the fleshy petals eaten, making it classified as a multiple fruit. Today, the jackfruit is largely used in Southeast Asian culinary cultures.

How Does It Taste?

The texture of the jackfruit is similar to that of the banana, manjo, and even the pineapple. Its dense and fibrous texture calls those fruits to mind quickly, but its taste sets it apart. Its distinctive taste has been described on one end as sweet, and on another as being similar to the taste of pulled pork.

Just Desserts!

The fleshy, sweet interior of the jackfruit makes it ideal for desserts. Follow this recipe for a delicious version of a Jackfruit Upside-Down Cake that combines different flavors for a sweetly unique cake. For something simpler and even quicker, give this recipe for Jackfruit Dessert Balls, also called Jackfruit Mulka, a try. This quick recipe leaves you with a sweet snack that is sure to delight all.

Tasty Extras

The seeds of this healthy fruit are also edible and are another way of benefitting from the impressive nutrient profile of this fruit. The jackfruit boasts low calories, low fat, high protein, a high level of vitamins, and a good amount of fiber.

All About the Jabuticaba

One of the fun parts about this fruit is its unique quality of growing not from a stem or flower, but directly from the trunk of a tree.

Pair that with its bright violet coloring, and how can you resist the Jabuticaba?

Fruit Description

Hugely popular in Brazil, the jabuticaba is not only eaten raw but also used to make jams and wine. However, because they are apt to quick fermentation once they are picked, the fresh fruit is difficult to find any distance outside of their native range.

How Does It Taste?

This beautifully purple Brazilian tree hosts deliciously tart fruit. The skin of the spheres of this fruit is edible, but not always eaten as it has a strong herbally flavor that stems from its high tannin content. Most often, the jabuticaba is eaten by breaking a hole in the skin of the fruit with your teeth and then sucking out the white and juicy flesh found within. The red jaboticaba has been described as tasting similar to blueberry yogurt. The grimal jaboticaba has a strong grape-like flavor, and the white jabuticaba has a sour lychee flavor.

Just Desserts!

What better way to highlight the flavor of this fruit than by infusing it within a syrup? Follow this recipe to infuse jaboticaba into syrup for a flavor that is not only juicy and sweet but also has a hint of spicy. The resulting syrup can be enjoyed on a variety of dishes.

A Place in Pop Culture

Most popular in beautiful Brazil, the slow growth of this delicious fruit and its quick and early fermentation once picked has kept it from international appreciation and recognition.

Tasty Extras

The tannin-rich skin of this fruit is also often used medicinally. It has been used for decades in the treatment of dysentery, asthma, and coughing up blood.